newartemis:

The sad part is not only is this completely true, but domestic violence still rose by 26% even when the team won.

La violencia doméstica aumenta un 38% cuando Inglaterra pierde un partido.
Aumenta un 26% cuando gana.

(Source: ieatemokids)

(Source: elchistedemel)

Happy Friday the 13th!

Members of the anti-superstition party walking underneath a ladder.Chicago, IL, 1940 

ilovecharts:

Ideas

via David T. Jones

instagram:

Going Back to the Roots with Henrique Oliveira’s Transarquitetônica

To see more photos and videos from Transarquitetônica, explore the MAC USP location page and browse the  #henriqueoliveira hashtag.

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira invites spectators to step inside his latest artwork and explore a giant wooden maze at São Paulo Museum MAC. His largest installation to date, Transarquitetônica is a 70 meter (229.66 ft) interactive sculpture made of  tapumes, a plywood material traditionally used for cheap housing in Brazil. As the piece’s name suggests, Oliveira’s work speaks to the concept of time and evolution. Spectators discover spaces of contrast, as certain areas reference today’s modern architecture while sprawling branches symbolize man’s first dwelling. instagram:

Going Back to the Roots with Henrique Oliveira’s Transarquitetônica

To see more photos and videos from Transarquitetônica, explore the MAC USP location page and browse the  #henriqueoliveira hashtag.

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira invites spectators to step inside his latest artwork and explore a giant wooden maze at São Paulo Museum MAC. His largest installation to date, Transarquitetônica is a 70 meter (229.66 ft) interactive sculpture made of  tapumes, a plywood material traditionally used for cheap housing in Brazil. As the piece’s name suggests, Oliveira’s work speaks to the concept of time and evolution. Spectators discover spaces of contrast, as certain areas reference today’s modern architecture while sprawling branches symbolize man’s first dwelling. instagram:

Going Back to the Roots with Henrique Oliveira’s Transarquitetônica

To see more photos and videos from Transarquitetônica, explore the MAC USP location page and browse the  #henriqueoliveira hashtag.

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira invites spectators to step inside his latest artwork and explore a giant wooden maze at São Paulo Museum MAC. His largest installation to date, Transarquitetônica is a 70 meter (229.66 ft) interactive sculpture made of  tapumes, a plywood material traditionally used for cheap housing in Brazil. As the piece’s name suggests, Oliveira’s work speaks to the concept of time and evolution. Spectators discover spaces of contrast, as certain areas reference today’s modern architecture while sprawling branches symbolize man’s first dwelling. instagram:

Going Back to the Roots with Henrique Oliveira’s Transarquitetônica

To see more photos and videos from Transarquitetônica, explore the MAC USP location page and browse the  #henriqueoliveira hashtag.

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira invites spectators to step inside his latest artwork and explore a giant wooden maze at São Paulo Museum MAC. His largest installation to date, Transarquitetônica is a 70 meter (229.66 ft) interactive sculpture made of  tapumes, a plywood material traditionally used for cheap housing in Brazil. As the piece’s name suggests, Oliveira’s work speaks to the concept of time and evolution. Spectators discover spaces of contrast, as certain areas reference today’s modern architecture while sprawling branches symbolize man’s first dwelling. instagram:

Going Back to the Roots with Henrique Oliveira’s Transarquitetônica

To see more photos and videos from Transarquitetônica, explore the MAC USP location page and browse the  #henriqueoliveira hashtag.

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira invites spectators to step inside his latest artwork and explore a giant wooden maze at São Paulo Museum MAC. His largest installation to date, Transarquitetônica is a 70 meter (229.66 ft) interactive sculpture made of  tapumes, a plywood material traditionally used for cheap housing in Brazil. As the piece’s name suggests, Oliveira’s work speaks to the concept of time and evolution. Spectators discover spaces of contrast, as certain areas reference today’s modern architecture while sprawling branches symbolize man’s first dwelling. instagram:

Going Back to the Roots with Henrique Oliveira’s Transarquitetônica

To see more photos and videos from Transarquitetônica, explore the MAC USP location page and browse the  #henriqueoliveira hashtag.

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira invites spectators to step inside his latest artwork and explore a giant wooden maze at São Paulo Museum MAC. His largest installation to date, Transarquitetônica is a 70 meter (229.66 ft) interactive sculpture made of  tapumes, a plywood material traditionally used for cheap housing in Brazil. As the piece’s name suggests, Oliveira’s work speaks to the concept of time and evolution. Spectators discover spaces of contrast, as certain areas reference today’s modern architecture while sprawling branches symbolize man’s first dwelling.

instagram:

Going Back to the Roots with Henrique Oliveira’s Transarquitetônica

To see more photos and videos from Transarquitetônica, explore the MAC USP location page and browse the #henriqueoliveira hashtag.

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira invites spectators to step inside his latest artwork and explore a giant wooden maze at São Paulo Museum MAC. His largest installation to date, Transarquitetônica is a 70 meter (229.66 ft) interactive sculpture made of tapumes, a plywood material traditionally used for cheap housing in Brazil. As the piece’s name suggests, Oliveira’s work speaks to the concept of time and evolution. Spectators discover spaces of contrast, as certain areas reference today’s modern architecture while sprawling branches symbolize man’s first dwelling.

todayinhistory:

June 6th 1944: D-DayOn this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. The largest amphibious military operation in history, the operation involved thousands of Allied troops landing in France. For those landing on the beaches of Normandy, they faced heavy fire, mines and other obstacles on the beach, but managed to push inland. In charge of the operation was future US President General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was British General Bernard Montgomery. The landings proved a decisive Allied victory, as they secured a foothold in France which had been defeated by Nazi Germany in 1940. D-Day was a key moment in the Second World War and helped turn the tide of the war in favour of the Allies. 70 years on, we remember not just the strategic victory that was D-Day but also the ultimate sacrifice paid by thousands of soldiers on both sides of the fighting.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

70 years ago today 
todayinhistory:

June 6th 1944: D-DayOn this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. The largest amphibious military operation in history, the operation involved thousands of Allied troops landing in France. For those landing on the beaches of Normandy, they faced heavy fire, mines and other obstacles on the beach, but managed to push inland. In charge of the operation was future US President General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was British General Bernard Montgomery. The landings proved a decisive Allied victory, as they secured a foothold in France which had been defeated by Nazi Germany in 1940. D-Day was a key moment in the Second World War and helped turn the tide of the war in favour of the Allies. 70 years on, we remember not just the strategic victory that was D-Day but also the ultimate sacrifice paid by thousands of soldiers on both sides of the fighting.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

70 years ago today 
todayinhistory:

June 6th 1944: D-DayOn this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. The largest amphibious military operation in history, the operation involved thousands of Allied troops landing in France. For those landing on the beaches of Normandy, they faced heavy fire, mines and other obstacles on the beach, but managed to push inland. In charge of the operation was future US President General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was British General Bernard Montgomery. The landings proved a decisive Allied victory, as they secured a foothold in France which had been defeated by Nazi Germany in 1940. D-Day was a key moment in the Second World War and helped turn the tide of the war in favour of the Allies. 70 years on, we remember not just the strategic victory that was D-Day but also the ultimate sacrifice paid by thousands of soldiers on both sides of the fighting.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

70 years ago today 
todayinhistory:

June 6th 1944: D-DayOn this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. The largest amphibious military operation in history, the operation involved thousands of Allied troops landing in France. For those landing on the beaches of Normandy, they faced heavy fire, mines and other obstacles on the beach, but managed to push inland. In charge of the operation was future US President General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was British General Bernard Montgomery. The landings proved a decisive Allied victory, as they secured a foothold in France which had been defeated by Nazi Germany in 1940. D-Day was a key moment in the Second World War and helped turn the tide of the war in favour of the Allies. 70 years on, we remember not just the strategic victory that was D-Day but also the ultimate sacrifice paid by thousands of soldiers on both sides of the fighting.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

70 years ago today

todayinhistory:

June 6th 1944: D-Day

On this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. The largest amphibious military operation in history, the operation involved thousands of Allied troops landing in France. For those landing on the beaches of Normandy, they faced heavy fire, mines and other obstacles on the beach, but managed to push inland. In charge of the operation was future US President General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was British General Bernard Montgomery. The landings proved a decisive Allied victory, as they secured a foothold in France which had been defeated by Nazi Germany in 1940. D-Day was a key moment in the Second World War and helped turn the tide of the war in favour of the Allies. 70 years on, we remember not just the strategic victory that was D-Day but also the ultimate sacrifice paid by thousands of soldiers on both sides of the fighting.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”
- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

70 years ago today

unhistorical:

May 17, 1954: The Supreme Court unanimously rules public school segregation unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education.

Sixty years ago today, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in a landmark case that the segregation of public schools was unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Newly-appointed Chief Justice Earl Warren wrote in the opinion:

Segregation of white and colored children in public schools has a detrimental effect upon the colored children. The impact is greater when it has the sanction of the law; for the policy of separating the races is usually interpreted as denoting the inferiority of the negro group…. We conclude that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of “separate but equal” has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.

The doctrine of “separate but equal” as justification for racial segregation emerged in the United States in the 1890s and was granted constitutional legitimacy in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), in which the court upheld a Louisiana law that provided for separate railway cars for blacks and whites. This decision laid the foundation for the dismantlement of Reconstruction Era reform, and for the enactment of Jim Crow laws. While de jure segregation was not as all-encompassing in the North, many former Union states also maintained racially segregated schools: it was the policy of the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas that Oliver L. Brown and twelve other plaintiffs challenged in Brown v. Board. At the time, the Board’s policy permitted Topeka’s school districts to segregate their elementary and middle schools. Throughout the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, the NAACP undertook a campaign to challenge “separate but equal” under legal premises. Under the direction of the NAACP, each of the plaintiffs enrolled their children in local all-white schools and, when the schools refused their children enrollment, filed a class action suit in the District Court of Kansas, which subsequently ruled in favor of the Board. This decision took place in 1951.

The case that was heard by the Supreme Court in 1953 comprised six separate NAACP-backed cases, including Brown v. Board. After much deliberation, the Warren Court decreed in a unanimous decision that the segregation of public schools violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The justices were divided on how Brown could be enforced and on the issue of judicial activism versus restraint, but Chief Justice Warren pushed for unanimity to further legitimize the decision and prevent Southern resistance (which persisted regardless). Although Brown was a key decision and the first step toward the end of de jure segregation, the path to desegregation was long and uncertain, and did not encompass solutions to de facto inequalities that had emerged during over half a century of racist policies. Topeka desegregated its elementary schools within two years, but resistance in the South against the court’s decision and against desegregation was inexorable, resulting in incidents such as the Little Rock Crisis and other manifestations of what Virginian politicians dubbed “massive resistance”.

listo:

Fox News’ misleading chart hides decades of Arctic Sea ice decline by only showing two years. The second graphic from Skeptic Science shows what Fox is trying to cover up. 

listo:

Fox News’ misleading chart hides decades of Arctic Sea ice decline by only showing two years. The second graphic from Skeptic Science shows what Fox is trying to cover up.